Tag archive for "advertising"

Marketing, Media

“Your Words Today” Campaign Promotes Hispanic Parental Engagement

   March 21 2011   5 Comments

According to a study conducted by the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute, Hispanics who have gone to college rank their parents as being most influential in their decision to continue their schooling. However, more than 65% of Hispanic parents do not have the knowledge to guide their children as they seek to apply and enroll in college.

This challenge is at the center of a campaign sponsored by the Hispanic Scholarship Fund and The Ad Council, with creative by the Grupo Gallegos ad agency. The first spot, “Julian” captures a voice-over conversation between a mother who wants her son to attend college, and her son who wants to skip college to get a job so he can buy “new stuff” like a phone and a car. The commercial focuses on the reasons mom and son each give to support their position. Here’s the spot:

The real emotional wallop comes as we see the son’s future unfold and change during the conversation; his economic future tied to each potential path. Most striking is the briefcase that turns into a small ice cooler and back again, signifying that the real choice at stake is between a white-collar career or a blue-collar job. These are visuals that any parent can relate to, regardless of ethnicity or economic status. The commercial’s closing reminder, “Their tomorrow depends on your words today,” puts the responsibility squarely on the parent’s shoulders.

This is an extremely powerful message, executed in a way that effectively hits an emotional nerve. And like I mentioned earlier, although it was created for an Hispanic audience, the message really speaks to parents of any race or ethnicity. It’s a really touching commercial that effectively speaks to parents.

The campaign is supported with a fantastic website (www.yourwordstoday.org), which provides a number of resources for parents including information on planning and paying for college.

Marketing

A Gen Yer Speaks Out on Marketing to Gen Y

   February 17 2010   0 Comments

Subcat Marketing chatted with Kristin Dziadul, founder of A New Generation a blog exploring Gen Y culture, marketing and social media. Kristin is a recent college graduate and member of Gen Y.

What should companies be doing today to reach younger consumers?
Companies must be using non-traditional media to reach younger consumers (i.e. mobile, social media, Internet, and viral techniques). Gen Y loves to share content, so if you give us something of value and interest that we can share, you can bet we will. We have tuned out of traditional media outlets including television, radio and magazines. We now have our smart phones, iPods, social networks and word-of-mouth to receive our daily news and information. Because of our drastic differences in media consumption (which is over eleven hours of media per day!), companies need to recognize that they must meet us at the media outlets where we are spending a majority of our time.

What are some common mistakes companies make when marketing to Gen Y?
I have noticed many companies talking down to us. They think that we do not know what is going on because we do not use the same types of media to obtain our information as the advertising executives use. This is a terrible assumption and you will quickly lose our respect by doing this. It is not that we are not informed, in fact, we are quite informed. We gather a majority of our information from friends, family, and the Internet. We have 24/7 access to all of these, so we actually are very informed, just in different ways. Companies need to stop creating dumbed-down advertisements targeted towards us and treat us as the educated consumers that we are and relate to us with our interests.

You had a recent blog post titled, “Why is Gen Y Obsessed with the Extraordinary?” How can companies use Gen Y’s obsession with the extraordinary to connect with this audience?
Make your ads and marketing stand out. We are a generation that wants to stand out and be different, so naturally we are attracted to companies or people that do the same. Companies must study the top trending topics for our age group and utilize those ideas in all marketing activities. For example, if we hear a popular song in your ad, we are more likely to tune in. Or, if you include a major event that we experienced in our lifetime, we will recognize it and be more in tune. If you make your brand stand out, we will notice. We are not an age group to settle with the status quo, we like to make an impact, and do business with companies that are doing the same.

What are some of your favorite youth brands? Why?
Apple because of the high quality, great integration with all their products, latest and greatest technology, and brand loyalty. Coach purses because of the fashion statement and high quality that the brand instills. American Eagle clothing because of the affordability and relaxed style they provide.

Any words of advice for companies not yet engaged in social media?
If your target market is Generation Y, you should strongly consider implementing a social media marketing strategy. Although our age group is not about content creation (i.e. blogging and consistent status updates), we do like to share information. If you reach us in the social networks we use (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, MySpace) and interact with us in a meaningful manner, we will be more likely to respond than by seeing your television commercial. To increase our response rate, tell us something cool and share-worthy. We gain a majority of our information from friends and family, so if you give us buzz-worthy information that we can pass on, that is great and free word-of-mouth marketing. In some ways, we may be easier to market to than other age groups. This is because all you have to do is meet us in the mediums that we are using, be friendly with us, and show that you care about what we want by providing us with great content. The days of carefully crafted advertising campaigns are over (at least towards us), and interaction on the Internet is in. If you are skeptical about social media implementation, bring in some Gen Y interns who can give their perspective and have insight into trending topics that we are interested in.

QUICK AND RANDOM THOUGHTS

Google Buzz?
I do not see the value in Google Buzz at all. I recently wrote a blog post titled “What Google Buzz Means for Non-Twitter Users.” I think for those of us that are already on Twitter and Facebook, Buzz is a waste of time. However, for those that are not on Twitter, it may be of value to them. It is quite easy to get onto it since it’s integrated with Gmail already, but it is not too user-friendly or secure yet.

Twitter?
I think Twitter is a great place to meet people in your area, with your same interests, and those who can give you great information in ways that Facebook and MySpace cannot. However, most Gen Y consumers are not on Twitter yet, quite simply because they do not know of its purpose. I use it for networking and learning opportunities as I am immersing myself into the social media and interactive marketing field, but others do not see the point in sending random updates to who knows who.

Apple iPad?
The iPad poses many great opportunities for colleges, businesses and individuals alike. The ability to access and organize endless amounts of information right from a book-sized device is incredible. For colleges, it could potentially replace the need for textbooks, saving a lot of money and paper. Businesses could allow employees to access all their work documents right from the iPad when they are on business trips, at a meeting or working from home. The only issue with the iPad is that it is between a iPhone and a computer, so consumers who already own both of those may not find a need for it right away. It will take awhile for the iPad to catch on, but it is a great idea and has several potential opportunities to become very useful in everyday life.

SMS Marketing?
SMS Marketing will become huge in the next year or so. Many of us have smart phones (i.e. iPhone and Blackberry) so we are able to access the Internet 24/7. If companies begin sending us highly targeted ads to our phones and we can easily click through to the web page and purchase right from our phone, that will be a great opportunity. Gen Y has much more disposable income than would be expected, and are very willing to spend it.

You can follow Kristin on Twitter, or read her blog, A New Generation.

Marketing

A Gen Yer Speaks Out on Marketing to Gen Y

   February 16 2010   1 Comment

Subcat Marketing chatted with Kristin Dziadul, founder of A New Generation a blog exploring Gen Y culture, marketing and social media. Kristin is a recent college graduate and member of Gen Y.

What should companies be doing today to reach younger consumers?
Companies must be using non-traditional media to reach younger consumers (i.e. mobile, social media, Internet, and viral techniques). Gen Y loves to share content, so if you give us something of value and interest that we can share, you can bet we will. We have tuned out of traditional media outlets including television, radio and magazines. We now have our  smart phones, iPods, social networks and word-of-mouth to receive our daily news and information. Because of our drastic differences in media consumption (which is over eleven hours of media per day!), companies need to recognize that they must meet us at the media outlets where we are spending a majority of our time.

What are some common mistakes companies make when marketing to Gen Y?
I have noticed many companies talking down to us. They think that we do not know what is going on because we do not use the same types of media to obtain our information as the advertising executives use. This is a terrible assumption and you will quickly lose our respect by doing this. It is not that we are not informed, in fact, we are quite informed. We gather a majority of our information from friends, family, and the Internet. We have 24/7 access to all of these, so we actually are very informed, just in different ways. Companies need to stop creating dumbed-down advertisements targeted towards us and treat us as the educated consumers that we are and relate to us with our interests.

You had a recent blog post titled, “Why is Gen Y Obsessed with the Extraordinary?” How can companies use Gen Y’s obsession with the extraordinary to connect with this audience?
Make your ads and marketing stand out. We are a generation that wants to stand out and be different, so naturally we are attracted to companies or people that do the same. Companies must study the top trending topics for our age group and utilize those ideas in all marketing activities. For example, if we hear a popular song in your ad, we are more likely to tune in. Or, if you include a major event that we experienced in our lifetime, we will recognize it and be more in tune. If you make your brand stand out, we will notice. We are not an age group to settle with the status quo, we like to make an impact, and do business with companies that are doing the same.

What are some of your favorite youth brands? Why?
Apple because of the high quality, great integration with all their products, latest and greatest technology, and brand loyalty. Coach purses because of the fashion statement and high quality that the brand instills. American Eagle clothing because of the affordability and relaxed style they provide.

Any words of advice for companies not yet engaged in social media?
If your target market is Generation Y, you should strongly consider implementing a social media marketing strategy. Although our age group is not about content creation (i.e. blogging and consistent status updates), we do like to share information. If you reach us in the social networks we use (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, MySpace) and interact with us in a meaningful manner, we will be more likely to respond than by seeing your television commercial. To increase our response rate, tell us something cool and share-worthy. We gain a majority of our information from friends and family, so if you give us buzz-worthy information that we can pass on, that is great and free word-of-mouth marketing. In some ways, we may be easier to market to than other age groups. This is because all you have to do is meet us in the mediums that we are using, be friendly with us, and show that you care about what we want by providing us with great content. The days of carefully crafted advertising campaigns are over (at least towards us), and interaction on the Internet is in. If you are skeptical about social media implementation, bring in some Gen Y interns who can give their perspective and have insight into trending topics that we are interested in.

QUICK AND RANDOM THOUGHTS

Google Buzz?
I do not see the value in Google Buzz at all. I recently wrote a blog post titled “What Google Buzz Means for Non-Twitter Users.” I think for those of us that are already on Twitter and Facebook, Buzz is a waste of time. However, for those that are not on Twitter, it may be of value to them. It is quite easy to get onto it since it’s integrated with Gmail already, but it is not too user-friendly or secure yet.

Twitter?
I think Twitter is a great place to meet people in your area, with your same interests, and those who can give you great information in ways that Facebook and MySpace cannot. However, most Gen Y consumers are not on Twitter yet, quite simply because they do not know of its purpose. I use it for networking and learning opportunities as I am immersing myself into the social media and interactive marketing field, but others do not see the point in sending random updates to who knows who.

Apple iPad?
The iPad poses many great opportunities for colleges, businesses and individuals alike. The ability to access and organize endless amounts of information right from a book-sized device is incredible. For colleges, it could potentially replace the need for textbooks, saving a lot of money and paper. Businesses could allow employees to access all their work documents right from the iPad when they are on business trips, at a meeting or working from home. The only issue with the iPad is that it is between a iPhone and a computer, so consumers who already own both of those may not find a need for it right away. It will take awhile for the iPad to catch on, but it is a great idea and has several potential opportunities to become very useful in everyday life.

SMS Marketing?
SMS Marketing will become huge in the next year or so. Many of us have smart phones (i.e. iPhone and Blackberry) so we are able to access the Internet 24/7. If companies begin sending us highly targeted ads to our phones and we can easily click through to the web page and purchase right from our phone, that will be a great opportunity. Gen Y has much more disposable income than would be expected, and are very willing to spend it.

You can follow Kristin on Twitter, or read her blog, A New Generation.

Marketing

Kia Courts Cool Parents with “Joyride”

   February 08 2010   0 Comments

There’s no doubt who Kia was targeting with its first-ever Super Bowl ad—young families!

The commercial features a cast of familiar kid-friendly characters (including Muno from Yo Gabba Gabba, sock puppet and Blabla’s Mr X) embarking on a joyride that takes them to Vegas, a tattoo parlor and a bowling alley. Throughout their adventures, the characters are grooving to “How You Like Me Now?” by indie band The Heavy.

The creative strategy and execution perfectly speaks to Kia’s primary target audience for the new 2011 Sorenta. According to Michael Sprague, VP of marketing for Kia, “we call them contemporary parents: they are people who have active lifestyles before they have kids, and still want to continue that lifestyle.” Sprague talks in detail about Kia’s parent marketing strategy in a recent interview with Media Post.

So my take on Kia’s “Joyride?”

  • Cool indie music: Check
  • Hip kiddie characters: Check
  • Slightly retro feel: Check
  • Tattoo reference: Check
  • Road trip to Vegas: Check

Kudos to the team at Kia.

Media

One cool Cookie

   December 04 2008   1 Comment

OK I admit it. I love Cookie Magazine. Yes, I know I am clearly not within the magazine’s target demographic (cool and hip moms), but I do have a two-year old daughter and that, I believe, helps me justify my subscription. Well that and the fact that it’s a great way to keep an eye on today’s Gen X mom market. Just flip through the pages and you’ll find some of the best advertising geared toward Gen X moms. It’s basically a who’s who of family products.

And unlike Parenting which always features some cute (but random) baby on the cover, Cookie magazine covers feature well-known celebrities and their offspring. From Brooke Shields and Amanda Peet, to Liv Tyler and Jada Pinkett-Smith, these celebrity moms give today’s Gen X moms the permission to retain their cool style and sense of adventure. Or as the Cookie media kit states:

“Cookie believes that being a good parent and maintaining your sense of style are not mutually exclusive.”

Oh, and did I mention their music reviews are impeccable. My daughter loves the new kids album from the jazz groove masters Medeski Martin and Wood. Thanks for the tip Cookie!

Education, Marketing

This exam brought to you by …

   December 03 2008   0 Comments


It’s no secret that California schools have had financial difficulties for quite some time, having dealt with years and years of budget cuts. And now with the state’s near bankrupt situation, there aren’t any signs of improvement in the near future.

So exactly how bad is it?

Tom Farber, a calculus teacher in Southern California, is selling ad space on his tests to generate revenue to buy much-needed supplies. The going rate is $10 for a quiz, $20 for an exam and $30 for the final exam (which has already sold out). The ads consist of a single line of text across the bottom of the first page. Farber so far has raised $350 which will go toward the $500 a year he typically spends on paper for his exams.

Most of the ad buys are by parents offering words of encouragement, though a few local business are also taking part. An ad run by a dentist mixes inspiration with a soft sales pitch: “Brace Yourself for a Great Semester! Braces by Henry.”

There’s no denying that teachers need to do something to help make up the difference for budget cuts. According to the National Education Association, the average teacher spends more than $400 of their own money on school supplies for their classroom. I think that figure is pretty conservative—my wife is a teacher and she’s already spent that much during the first semester!

So will this trend take off? If schools continue to suffer budget cuts (which they will), they’ll be forced to look at creative ways to raise funds (which they are). Selling ad space can help many schools fill the money gap, as well as offer advertisers access to a highly-coveted demographic: teens. The key for advertisers who decide to follow Henry the Dentist’s lead is to amp up the inspiration and dial down the hard sell. I think Peter Parker’s dear Uncle Ben put it best: “With great power comes great responsibility.”